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Latin quotes in english

When used in English, it indicates that something is incomplete or partially finished e. Verbatim: In exactly the same words Derived from the Latin verbum, which simply means word, verbatim refers to repeating something word-for-word from the original. In English, it is used as a prefix to describe something that contains more than one of something else e. Ad hoc: To this In Latin, ad hoc literally means to this, which has been adapted by English speakers as a saying that denotes that something is created or done for a particular purpose, as necessary. IGNOTUM PER IGNOTIUS Also known as obscurum per obscurius "the obscure by the more obscure" , the phrase ignotum per ignotius "the unknown by the more unknown" refers to an unhelpful explanation that is just as or even more confusing than that which it is attempting to explain—for instance, imagine someone asking you what obscurum per obscurius meant, and you telling them that it means the same as ignotum per ignotius. Nowadays, alibi commonly refers to evidence that someone did not commit a usually criminal act because he or she was elsewhere at the time the act was committed. Pro bono publico : For the good of the public Pro bono indicates that something is being done without payment or reimbursement. Per se: In itself Meaning by, of, for, or in itself in Latin, per se is a common phrase used to emphasize the importance or connection of something e.

Literally meaning "who benefits? Versus: Against This common Latin phrase was originally a preposition meaning against or toward.

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Et cetera: And so on Used at the end of a list to indicate that further items could be included, et cetera or etc. To the people of Rome, the threat of an attack from Hannibal soon made him something of a bogeyman, and as a result Roman parents would often tell their unruly children that Hanniabl ad portas—"Hannibal is at the gates"—in order to scare them into behaving properly. Ad hoc: To this In Latin, ad hoc literally means to this, which has been adapted by English speakers as a saying that denotes that something is created or done for a particular purpose, as necessary. Verbatim: In exactly the same words Derived from the Latin verbum, which simply means word, verbatim refers to repeating something word-for-word from the original. Extra: In addition to A common English adjective and prefix, extra is a Latin preposition that means outside or in addition. It is most often used to add information that states something in different words or to give a more specific example: Most of the puppies i. Below are 24 of the most common Latin phrases we use in the English language. Multi: Many Multi is the plural form of the Latin adjective multus, meaning many. Status quo: Existing state of affairs This straight-up Latin phrase literally translates to the state in which and is used in English to describe an existing state of affairs, usually related to political or social issues. Hundreds of words—like memo, alibi, agenda, census, veto, alias, via, alumni, affidavit and versus—are all used in everyday English, as are abbreviations like i. Carpe diem: Seize the day A common phrase with motivational speakers and go-getters, carpe diem is a Latin phrase that means seize the day, made popular by the Roman poet Horace. Per se: In itself Meaning by, of, for, or in itself in Latin, per se is a common phrase used to emphasize the importance or connection of something e. Versus: Against This common Latin phrase was originally a preposition meaning against or toward. Re simply means about, and in modern times, we see it used most often in responses to emails and in other correspondence to refer to an earlier topic of discussion. Like "holding a tiger by the tail," it is used to describe an unsustainable situation, and in particular one in which both doing nothing and doing something to resolve it are equally risky.

Ergo: Therefore Ergo, an adverb meaning therefore, is one Latin phrase that has maintained its meaning exactly in English usage. It literally means "senseless thunderbolt. To the people of Rome, the threat of an attack from Hannibal soon made him something of a bogeyman, and as a result Roman parents would often tell their unruly children that Hanniabl ad portas—"Hannibal is at the gates"—in order to scare them into behaving properly.

When used in English, it indicates that something is incomplete or partially finished e.

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Nowadays, alibi commonly refers to evidence that someone did not commit a usually criminal act because he or she was elsewhere at the time the act was committed. Like "holding a tiger by the tail," it is used to describe an unsustainable situation, and in particular one in which both doing nothing and doing something to resolve it are equally risky.

The meaning has changed somewhat in English usage to mean something that is real or genuine e.

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In English, it is used as a prefix to describe something that contains more than one of something else e. In English, versus is used to signify opposing forces or oppositions and contrasts. Re: About You probably use this Latin preposition every day without really understanding its meaning. IGNOTUM PER IGNOTIUS Also known as obscurum per obscurius "the obscure by the more obscure" , the phrase ignotum per ignotius "the unknown by the more unknown" refers to an unhelpful explanation that is just as or even more confusing than that which it is attempting to explain—for instance, imagine someone asking you what obscurum per obscurius meant, and you telling them that it means the same as ignotum per ignotius. Et cetera: And so on Used at the end of a list to indicate that further items could be included, et cetera or etc. De Facto: In fact De facto is a Latin phrase that, literally translated, means of fact. Hundreds of words—like memo, alibi, agenda, census, veto, alias, via, alumni, affidavit and versus—are all used in everyday English, as are abbreviations like i. Nowadays, alibi commonly refers to evidence that someone did not commit a usually criminal act because he or she was elsewhere at the time the act was committed. Literally meaning "who benefits? When the error was pointed out to him, Sigismund angrily proclaimed that because he was Emperor, even if the word was neuter which it was it would be feminine from now on, at which point one member of the Council supposedly stood and replied, "Caesar non supra grammaticos"—or "The Emperor is not above the grammarians. Quid pro quo: Something for something A contrasting philosophy to pro bono is quid pro quo.
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Latin phrases everyone should know